Heal and Protect


About Us

"Work hard, play hard” is our family motto.

Bobby and Susan. They are the father/daughter team that jointly designed the website. Susan took most of the photos and wrote most of the text, while Bobby is webmaster and implemented the design. This is truly a three-generation business.

After harvesting many pack baskets worth of nettles for our hair products, we dry them in our greenhouse. By the end of May when nettles are in their prime, the greenhouse is empty as we’ve just finished planting all our veggie, herb and flower starts in the high tunnel or ground.

Susan and Patrick love exploring Alaska and being in nature as much as possible. We are grateful our work with Alpenglow fosters that love.

Liam loves helping the business, especially when he gets to use wheels. He deftly finagles the trailer loads of empty bottles and jars to our packaging shed behind the workshop. This saves not only time but his mother’s back.

Kachemak Bay gifts us with food, views, an incredible place to walk and learn, and a place to center our spirit and remember how fortunate we are to live here.

The view from our house and workshop and the high tunnel on the right. There is no place like home.

Our high tunnel (aka hoop house) extends our brief growing season by increasing temperatures and reducing wind. At 30 x 60 feet there is lots of room for vegetables, as well as herbs and flowers that we grow and make infusions and extracts from, for Alpenglow products.

We love living so close to the sea, yet right in the mountains. Yes we have a long, dark, cold winter, and life is not easy at this latitude, but we love Alaska and the community we live in.

Off to harvest berries and hike across Kachemak Bay. Alana learns the ropes of steering in choppy seas on a boat borrowed from generous friends.

Hiking in a meadow of lupine and other wildflowers.

Dipnetting for red salmon is not what you call quiet or peaceful along the Kenai River. But Alaskan’s love their salmon and this huge dipnet (for state residents only) can be an efficient method to obtain about 30 Sockeyes – our annual consumption of deliciousness.

Susan teaches classes and workshops for school groups, nature centers, homeschoolers and at farmer’s markets. At our daughter’s school, they grew a few varieties of Calendula, which we harvested, dehydrated and made into a healing balm for the children to take home. They participated in every step of the process. Not only educational, super fun too!

A high priority for our family (and business) is to grow and harvest as much food as possible from our healthy environment. Every summer we make ice cream with home grown berries. Liam and Alana are happy to hand-crank the ice cream maker as the reward is scrumptious!

While hiking in a storm, Alana took a rest, laid on this rock and stared up at the dark clouds above.

A field near our home that overlooks Cook Inlet and the volcanos beyond. An incredible view in all seasons.

Girdwood Forest Fair is our favorite annual festival. Once we park the vehicle for the weekend, we travel by two feet, or two wheels from the festival to our accomodations. The Fourth of July Parade is not to be missed with very Alaskan floats. Our lab Luna loves it as much as we do.

Luna is “the best” dog in the world, at least according to us. Hope you have some special critters in your life too.

Blueberries with a fallen caribou antler in the tundra.

A long winter means a long ski season. We are grateful for our local trails and get out as often as we can.